Anzeige
Fauna Marin GmbH Meerwasser24.de Tropic Marin All for Reef Whitecorals.com Korallen-Zucht

Translation in process
We're updating the page. There might be some translation errors. Sorry about that ;-)

Trichechus manatus

...

Copyright Gaylen Rathburn (Rathbun?)

Uploaded by AndiV.
Image detail


Profile

lexID:
4282 
AphiaID:
159509 
Scientific:
Trichechus manatus 
German:
Karibik-Manati oder Florida-Manati 
English:
West Indian Manatee 
Category:
Mamiphères 
Family tree:
Animalia (Kingdom) > Chordata (Phylum) > Mammalia (Class) > Sirenia (Order) > Trichechidae (Family) > Trichechus (Genus) > manatus (Species) 
Initial determination:
Linnaeus, 1758 
Occurrence:
Jamaica, Puerto Rico, Venezuela, Suriname, Haiti, Costa Rica, Bahamas, Belize, Brésil, Caraïbes, Floride, golfe du Mexique, Honduras, Kuba, Mexique (Nord-est du Pacifique), Nicaragua , Panama, Polynésie Française, Republique dominicaine, USA 
Size:
250 cm - 450 cm 
Temperature:
~ 20°C 
Food:
Sea weed, Aquatic plant, algues, spécialiste de la nourriture 
Difficulty:
Pas pour l'aquarium! 
Related species at
Catalog of Life
:
 
Author:
Publisher:
Meerwasser-Lexikon.de
Created:
Last edit:
2012-04-03 20:14:01 

Husbandry

Linnaeus, 1758

"West Indian manatees are big, slow-moving, gentle vegetarians. They live in warm, shallow water in coastal rivers, estuaries, and lagoons. In winter, large groups of manatees sometimes congregate where warm water is being discharged from factories. Manatees feed on underwater vegetation, including algae, and sometimes graze on plants growing on shore that hang within their reach, but they never haul themselves out of the water. When they are active, they surface every few minutes to breathe, but when they are resting they can stay submerged for almost half an hour. Females produce a calf (occasionally twins) every two or three years. The calf stays very close to its mother until it is weaned, which can be as long as two years. Mother and calf communicate with squeaks and grunts.

Adaptation: "Like the maneuverable head end of upright vacuum cleaners, the ""bent"" shape of the snout and mandible of this Manatee, Trichechus manatus, is probably an adaptation to position the mouth in a way that makes lip-feeding efficient while the body behind it is more or less vertical. These animals hover buoyantly above the sea grass in their typical foraging-feeding posture, with the head tilted down and tail up."

Pictures

Commonly

1

Husbandry know-how of owners

0 husbandary tips from our users available
Show all

Discussion

Last comment in the discussion about Trichechus manatus

Last comment in the discussion about Trichechus manatus